Retired Ohio State Football Numbers

Here are all the retired Ohio State football jersey numbers and the dates in which they were retired. Ohio State has since announced there will not be any additional numbers retired. Hence the reason #10 has not been retired for the only Heisman Trophy winner not to have his number retired, Troy Smith.
#45 Archie Griffin (10/30/99)
#31 Vic Janowicz (9/23/00)
#40 Howard “Hopalong” Cassady (11/18/00)
#22 Leslie “Les” Horvath (10/6/01)
#27 Eddie George (11/10/01)
#47 “Chic” Harley (10/30/04)
WH Woody Hayes (9/10/05)
#99 Bill Willis (11/03/07)

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OSU Football Tradition 105 – Carmen Ohio

In 1902 the Buckeyes suffered their worst defeat, to the team up north no less, 86-0. On the train ride home, player Fred Cornell wrote “Carmen Ohio” while the teams heart strings were being tugged upon due to the loss.

In 2001 the tradition was started where the entire team stands facing the band following the home games and sings the alma matter song. It is quite the powerful sight sending chills down the spine of every Buckeye fan, especially folling a huge win.

“Oh! Come let’s sing Ohio’s praise,
and songs to Alma Mater raise;
While our hearts rebounding thrill,
with joy which death alone can still.
Summer’s heat or winter’s cold.
The seasons pass, the years will roll;
Time and change will surely show
How firm thy friendship O-hi-o.
These jolly days of priceless worth,
By far the gladdest days on earth,
Soon will pass and we not know,
How dearly we love O-hi-o.
We should strive to keep the name,
Of fair repute and spotless fame,
So, in college halls we’ll grow,
To love the better, O-hi-o.
Tho’ age may dim our mem’ry’s store,
We’ll think of happy days of yore,
True to friend and frank to foe,
As sturdy sons of O-hi-o.
If on seas of care we roll,
‘Neath blackened sky, o’er barren shoal,
Tho’ts of thee bid darkness go,
Dear Alma Mater O-hi-o.”

OSU Football Tradition 104 – The Victory Bell

Since the victory on Oct 2 1954 vs Cal, the victory bell rings for approximately 15 minutes after each home victory. The bell was a gift to the University from the classes of 1943, ’44 & ’45. The Alpha Phi Omega fraternity rings the bell for 30 minutes after a victory over the team up north.

Buckeye Leaf Helmet Stickers – How do the player’s get them?

Ok, here it is, a labor of love. This list took me about 8 hours to compile and put in a usable format. But, I think it will be an informative and entertaining resource.

The Buckeye Leaf sticker awards history has been detailed here : Buckeye Leaf

People still mistakenly call them just Buckeyes when in all actuality they are Buckeye leaves. The team uses black color leaves not green as they are commonly mistaken for.

Most of the head coaches have used their own system for determining how the players are awarded stickers. Tressel’s list is detailed below. I am not sure how Earle Bruce and John Cooper handed them out. But Woody’s stickers sure filled the helmet up a lot quicker then todays version:

The sticker awards is one of the most recognizable distinguishing marks separating the Buckeyes from all other teams. Other teams have tried to copy the helmet awards

but lets be honest, the Buckeyes have a one of kind tradition that isn’t going to work for any other team. Here is an ESPN article on just how ‘icon-ic’ this Buckeye tradition is ESPN Helmet Awards

Below is Tressel’s award criteria list. If you click on the picture it will bring up a larger more readable version of this list. Enjoy!

OSU Football Tradition 103 – Buckeye Grove

Founded in 1934, Buckeye Grove is in honor of all the first team All-Americans. Each player that has won that honor recieves a Buckeye tree planted in the grove in their honor which includes a plaque along the walking path, with their name and honorary winning year.

The grove was originally located on the east side of the stadium, but was moved to the rear corner as part of the expansion renovation in 2001. There are over 125 players in the grove. Each year that there are new players they are added during a pre-game ceremony prior to to the annual spring game.

Here is a list of all of

Ohio State’s 1st Team All Americans:

1914 Boyd Cherry
1916 Chic Harley
Robert Karch
1917 Charles Bolen
Harold Courtney
Chic Harley
Kelley VanDyne
1918 Clarence MacDonald
1919 Chic Harley
Gaylord Stinchcomb
1920 Iolas Huffman
Gaylord Stinchcomb
1921 Iolas Huffman
Cyril Myers
1923 Harry Workman
1924 Harold Cunningham
1925 Edwin Hess
1926 Edwin Hess
Martin Karow
Leo Raskowski
1927 Leo Raskowski
1928 Wesley Fesler
1929 Wesley Fesler
1930 Wesley Fesler
Lew Hinchman
1931 Carl Cramer
Lew Hinchman
1932 Joseph Gailus
Sid Gillman
Lew Hinchman
Ted Rosequist
1933 Joseph Gailus
1934 Regis Monahan
Merle Wendt
1935 Gomer Jones
Merle Wendt
1936 Charles Hamrick
Inwood Smith
Merle Wendt
1937 Carl Kaplanoff
Jim McDonald
Ralph Wolf
Gust Zarnas
1939 Vic Marino
Esco Sarkkinen
Donald Scott
1940 Donald Scott
1942 Robert Shaw
Charles Csuri
Lindell Houston
Paul Sarringhaus
Gene Fekete
1943 Bill Willis
1944 Les Horvath
Jack Dugger
Bill Willis
William Hackett
1945 Warren Amling
Ollie Cline
Russell Thomas
1946 Warren Amling
Cecil Souders
1950 Victor Janowicz
Robert Momsen
Robert McCullough
1952 Mike Takacs
1954 Dean Dugger
Howard Cassady
Jim Reichenbach
1955 Howard Cassady
Jim Parker
1956 Jim Parker
1957 Aurealius Thomas
1958 James Houston
Jim Marshall
Bob White
1959 Jim Houston
1960 Bob Ferguson
1961 Bob Ferguson
1964 Jim Davidson
Ike Kelley
Arnie Chonko
1965 Douglas Van Horn
Ike Kelley
1966 Ray Pryor
1968 David Foley
Rufus Mayes
1969 Jim Stillwagon
Rex Kern
Jim Otis
Ted Provost
Jack Tatum
1970 Jim Stillwagon
John Brockington
Jack Tatum
Mike Sensibaugh
Tim Anderson
Jan White
1971 Tom DeLeone
1972 John Hicks
Randy Gradishar
1973 John Hicks
Randy Gradishar
Archie Griffin
Van Ness DeCree
1974 Archie Griffin
Van Ness DeCree
Kurt Schumacher
Pete Cusick
Steve Myers
Neal Colzie
Tom Skladany
1975 Archie Griffin
Ted Smith
Tim Fox
Tom Skladany
1976 Bob Brudzinski
Chris Ward
Tom Skladany
1977 Chris Ward
Aaron Brown
Tom Cousineau
Ray Griffin
1978 Tom Cousineau
1979 Ken Fritz
Art Schlichter
1982 Marcus Marek
1984 James Lachey
Keith Byars
1985 Thomas Johnson
1986 Cris Carter
Chris Spielman
1987 Chris Spielman
Tom Tupa
1988 Jeff Uhlenhake
1991 Steve Tovar
1992 Steve Tovar
1993 Korey Stringer
Dan Wilkinson
1994 Korey Stringer
1995 Eddie George
Terry Glenn
Orlando Pace
Mike Vrabel
1996 Orlando Pace
Shawn Springs
Mike Vrabel
1997 Andy Katzenmoyer
Rob Murphy
Antoine Winfield
1998 David Boston
Damon Moore
Rob Murphy
Antoine Winfield
1999 Na’il Diggs
2000 Mike Doss
2001 LeCharles Bentley
Mike Doss
2002 Mike Doss
Andy Groom
Mike Nugent
Matt Wilhelm
2003 Will Allen
Will Smith
2004 A.J. Hawk
Mike Nugent
Ted Ginn Jr.
2005 A.J. Hawk
2006 Troy Smith
Quinn Pitcock
James Laurinaitis
2007
James Laurinaitis

OSU Football Tradition 102 – The Skull Session

The Skull Session is a huge part of the game day experience on the Ohio State University Campus. It is an event that involves the team, the band and the fans. Fans pack St John’s arena every game day about 2 hours before the game. The band plays the fight songs getting the crowd hyped up. Coach will speak essentially giving a pep talk to the team and fans. And then as the players leave the arena they being the walk to the stadium to get ready for the game.

  • Started as the band’s warm-up routine.
  • Rounghly attended by average of 10,000 fans.
  • Coach Tressel began the tradition of bringing the team to the Skull Session in 2001.
  • Coach Tressel and a senior will speak to the crown at each Skull Session
  • At the conclusion, the team walks to the stadium and down the ramp, onto the locker room to being that game’s preperation.

OSU Football Tradition 101 – Buckeye Leaf Stickers

I will be doing a huge story on how the OSU players get Buckeyes for their helmets. Interesting because I found this story. Please feel free to comment:

Buckeye stickers a tradition 40 years in the making

By John D. Lukacs

The year was 1968 — that much of the story we know. According to Ohio State lore, the Buckeyes were on the cusp of a championship campaign when longtime trainer Ernie Biggs conceived of the idea of awarding players helmet stickers resembling buckeye leaves, presumably for motivational purposes.

Coach Woody Hayes embraced the idea and, 40 falls later, sticker-cluttered helmets across the country reveal that Biggs’ brainstorm has, well, stuck.
It’s the time of year when dog bones are appearing on Georgia’s helmets, paw prints on Clemson’s and tomahawks on those of Florida State, just to name a few. But it all started with those buckeye leaves. Which begs the question: why? The exact reason has been lost, perhaps in a cloud of dust, to history.

“Woody was always trying to get that extra motivational edge,” proposed Rex Kern, OSU’s quarterback during that magical fall of ’68.

In all likelihood, Hayes and Biggs reasoned that rewarding great plays provided incentive for more of the same. That rationale remains, yet like the Buckeyes’ uniforms, there have been some subtle changes to the tradition over the years.

Visibly, the stickers themselves have been reduced in size, and the criteria for receiving a buckeye has been considerably refined. Coach Jim Tressel favors a teamwork approach over an individual-based award system, which means that touchdowns and interceptions no longer necessarily guarantee a coveted sticker. Big plays are now solely considered such at Tressel’s discretion.

Every team member, however, receives a buckeye for each OSU win, plus an additional sticker for Big Ten victories. Entire units are eligible if they meet certain criteria. If the Buckeyes’ defense, for example, racks up at least five three-and-outs, each member receives a sticker. The Buckeyes’ offense, upon executing 10 plays which gain 12 or more yards, is rewarded similarly.

Individually, players accrue buckeyes by meeting the film-grade standards set for each position by the coaching staff. Linemen must grade out at 80 percent to receive a buckeye. Standards for linebackers and skill positions (such as running backs and defensive backs) are more stringent, requiring grades of 85 percent and 90 percent, respectively.

Special teams also figure prominently in the buckeye breakdown. Causing and/or recovering a fumble will earn a member of the punt or kickoff teams a buckeye. Successfully blocking a kick or converting a fake field goal also nets the unit a sticker. Kick a field goal from 45 yards or beyond? You guessed it — one buckeye.

Perhaps the most notable change from the Hayes era is the manner in which the stickers are distributed. Hayes was notoriously stingy with the leaves, so when it came time to award them, it was “a major production,” Kern recalled. A player was called up before the team during the Monday meeting, presented his buckeye leaves and slapped on the shoulders by a beaming Hayes.

Of course, what the famously mercurial Buckeyes boss giveth, he could — at least theoretically — taketh away.

“In true Woody Hayes fashion, he threatened to take [the buckeye leaves] away,” Kern said. “We thought it was tongue-in-cheek, but you never really knew”.

According to current equipment manager Lewis VanHoose, Tressel eschews Hayes’ Patton-esque theatrics. After the Sunday film review session, the coaches provide VanHoose with a master list detailing the number of buckeyes to be awarded that week. With little fanfare, he then painstakingly places the stickers on OSU’s shimmering silver helmets by hand.
As the season progresses, there is less and less space on the helmets; VanHoose estimates that one side of a helmet can hold approximately 35-40 stickers, a good half-season’s work for a solid player on a talented team. And there’s even less room for counting errors. The players, who scrutinize VanHoose’s handiwork with keen eyes, don’t need the board in the auxiliary lounge to keep track of how many buckeyes they have.

“People know,” VanHoose said.

That off-field competition for buckeye leaves continues to spur on-field production, just as Biggs and Hayes intended 40 years ago.

“You know, buckeyes tell a story,” VanHoose said. “You can kind of see that story as the season goes on.”

While one story unfolds in the Los Angeles Coliseum on Saturday night when Ohio State faces USC, another will peel, unpretentiously, into its fifth decade inside the equipment room back in Columbus on Monday morning.